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PHOTOS

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TRACKLIST

  1. Jump The Blues
  2. Driving My Young Life Away
  3. Viper Of Melody
  4. Throwin' My Money Away [MP3]
  5. Your Love and His Blood
  6. Working At Working [MP3]
  7. Moving On #3
  8. Tropical Blues
  9. Dog House Blues
  10. High Rolling Train
  11. Midnight Stars and You
  12. Frieght Train Boogie
  13. Lonesome Highway

Limited Edition LP  SOLD OUT

"You won't hear better, clearer, more invigorating old-school guitar and stand-up bass tones anywhere, and Hancock's tenor conveys the party and the heartbreak and the long and lonely road with equally wistful success." —Reax

"Road-tested, world-weary, but unbowed, Hancock and his band have turned their historical fascinations into comfort music: dwelling on the past as a balm for surviving the present." —Blurt

"Gives the finger to modern country and all of that VH1-courting, crossover-appeal horse pucky. Touted by none other than Hank Williams III for capturing the cowboy spirit of Hank Williams Sr. better than either of his namesakes, Hancock is one of those rare artists who seem to have developed a knack for musical time travel. His lovely, lazy style of old-school Western swing so authentic, you'll be seeing in black and white and hearing in mono." —DC Decider

"The music has a solid retro vibe, but the songs, which are filled with classic country themes such as death, marriage and surviving in troubled times, are startlingly contemporary in their content." —Dayton Daily News

 

Wayne Hancock Viper of Melody

BS 163 2009 $8.95
CD$8.95BUY
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"Describing Hancock’s mastery is like trying to explain the force of a natural event such as a tornado to someone who has never experienced one. Even when he plays the music slow and drawls out the lyrics of love, his power is palpable. There’s a self-evident intensity behind every note." —PopMatters.com

"It sounds as if Wayne Hancock has been around forever. But to get your mind around that, it's first necessary to grasp the notion of timelessness.  Timelessness is this essential rightness, like the sound a slapped bass makes, or hearing a butter-smooth voice shout out a player's name, sparking a solo turn during a tune that swings so hard you almost flinch. The sound is country in essence, but you'll also hear some hot jazz, some blues, even a little rock snarl. But it's all just ... well ... right." —Chicago Tribune

"I want to jump the blues and make the hard times swing."

So opens Wayne The Train's new album, and it's a deft proclamation of his unwavering belief in the curative energy of juke joint swing.

Man, there ain't a problem that can't be salved by his brand of stripped down, intensely rhythmic amalgam of hillbilly, roadhouse blues, honky-tonk, rockabilly and hep-cat boogie. It's an infectious and unpretentious sound telling quotidian tales of driving your life away, throwing your money away, playing the slots and twisting one up with your friends, and rich with a strain of populism that shimmies all the way back to Jimmie Rodgers, one that makes the holes in your roof and holes in your shoes all part of our common humanity. It's all played with an old school musicianship and a stand-on-the-edge-of-the stage immediacy that rockets out of the speakers.

Yeah, Wayne might be a throwback, but his conviction and energy kick to the curb any preconceived notions about what that means. Just check out that fuzzed out James Burton-styled guitar solo on "Dog House Blues," the straight up stand-up bass breakdown on "Throwin' Away My Money" or the jazz inflected git runs on "Freight Train Boogie." Even when he sings on the hard times like "the rich folks call it recession, but the poor folks call it depression" in "Workin' at Workin'," this Austin, TX native does it with a big smile and keeps the dance floor full, calling out solos to crack players like a modern day Bob Wills. Hell, you can even dance to his murder ballads. Check out "Your Love and His Blood" and "Moving On #3" if you don't believe us.

Produced by long time collaborator Lloyd Maines (Joe Ely, Wilco, Uncle Tupelo, Dixie Chicks), Viper of Melody is a tick-tight organic affair full of first takes and a near telepathic interplay by the band. It's not surprising given that this band clocks in 200+ shows a year. If you live somewhere between Portland, Maine and Portland, Oregon, you're likely going to get a chance to see for yourself.

"The music jumps and swings, often at once, pushing the sound to maximum effect. There’s an unspoken rule in country that those singers who really are the all-timers have a little catch in their voice, that spot between words where infinity rushes in, and when you hear it there is not doubt you’re in the presence of greatness. Wayne Hancock has it, just so you know, and likely always has." —Sonic Boomers

 

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